Swiss Medical Informatics

Edition 2017/00

Störbern Sie in unserem aktuellen Magazin oder entdecken Sie unsere neusten Ausgabe!

SMI

Welche elektronischen Arzneimitteldatenbanken mit pädiatrischen Dosierungen werden von Schweizer Medizinalpersonen konsultiert?

Original article
Sabina Hiltbrunner, et. al.
Published on 01.01.2017
CS2\Cs2Journal\Domain\Model\Author:105596
+2
Background: Determining the correct drug dosages for children is delicate. Drugs are frequently used \"off-label\"or \"unlicensed\"and dosage recommendations in the summary of product characteristics (SPC) are rarely available. The aim of our survey wsa to analyze the behaviour of Swiss healthcare professionals regarding their use of electronic drug databases, focusing on databases for pediatric dosages.Method/Results: An online survey was sent to Swiss pediatricians (N=1806) and pharmacists (N=2073). The rate of return was 23% (N=882). Over 70% of all participants use electronic drug databases at least once a week, whereas 36% use them daily. Only 6% never use electronic drug databases.The utilization of different information systems was analyzed. Websites on the computer and guidelines of the respective institution are mostly used. Such guidelines are crucial for pediatricians on the children's ward, 57% use them at least once a week. However, only 13% of the Swiss healthcare professionals use mobile apps at least once a week to look up pediatric dosages, 65% never use mobile apps.The most important database for pediatric dosages was www.compendium.ch followed by the website of the University Children's Hospital (www.kinderdosierungen.ch).Conclusion: Our results show that electronic information about pediatric dosages is frequently used by pediatricians and pharmacists and crucial for their daily work. The most important sources for pediatric dosages are the SPC and www.kinderdosierungen.ch. Especially in case of \"off-label\"or \"unlicensed use\"this website is an important tool for Swiss healthcare professionals.
Read more
Alevtina Dubovitskaya, et. al.
Published on 01.01.2017
Alevtina Dubovitskaya
+4

Electronic medical records (EMRs) are critical, highly sensitive private information in healthcare, and need to be frequently shared among peers. Blockchain provides a shared, immutable and transparent history of all the transactions to build applications with trustability, accountability and transparency. This provides a unique opportunity to develop a secure and trustable EMR data management and sharing system by using blockchain. We present our perspectives on blockchain-based healthcare data management. We implemented a framework for managing and sharing EMR data on cancer patient care that ensures privacy, security, availability, and fine-grained access control over EMR data.

Jean-Paul Calbimonte, et. al.
Published on 01.01.2017
Jean-Paul Calbimonte
+4

Research in the healthcare domain requires the collection of important and exhaustive datasets in order to validate a scientific hypothesis, or to assess the effectiveness of a treatment, technology, medicine, or procedure. The data acquisition phase for this type of work requires an often under-estimated amount of time and effort, while needing to maintain high quality standards for the entire process. Many of the tasks associated with data acquisition are often carried out manually, resulting in error-prone procedures, hand-transcription, inaccuracy, and time delays to produce a usable dataset. This paper presents MedRed (medical research data acquisition platform), an interface  and a service designed to facilitate the data acquisition process for researchers in the healthcare domain, and using REDCap software for data capture. This service is available first of all to all scientists at the HES-SO (University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland) schools in Switzerland, and is partially supported by the Swiss universities’ CUS-P2 programme.

Marc Oertle
Published on 01.01.2017
Marc Oertle

Background: Error prevention in healthcare is paramount. Beyond introducing computerised provider order entry (CPOE) and automated medication dispensing systems, patient identification systems have also been proposed in an effort to increase patient safety while reducing misidentification. Electronic patient records are thus integrated into closed-loop systems. In Switzerland, there are no systematic data available on misidentification rates in hospitals. This study sought to evaluate the nature and frequency of the misidentifications prevented using a computerised, multipurpose, workflow-integrated patient identification system as part of a fully electronic patient record. We analysed actions comprising phlebotomy, drug administration, and transfusion. Methods: Over a 30-month period, 24 879 in-patient stays in a public hospital were analysed concerning identification system usage and prevented misidentification, focusing on phlebotomy, transfusion, and drug administration areas. All identification checks were performed using the same device and software. Results: The results of 38 199 bedside checks revealed low misidentification rates and moderate system usage within a non-mandatory setting Clear differences were noted between specific tasks. In this setting, a total of 457 misidentifications were prevented by the system. Conclusion: Misidentifications are not common, generally occurring in less than 2% of bedside actions. The absolute numbers are, however, cause for concern and thus merit significant preventive efforts. While implementing a multipurpose system can increase nurse acceptance, this is associated with additional workload pertaining to identification checks, which proves an issue. Increasing patient safety by introducing a wristband identification system, for example, thus appears worthwhile, although it must be designed as to respect the socio-technical environment.